Bookish naughty or nice tag

I was tagged by shadowriverdaleharley

THE LIST

–Received an ARC and not reviewed it
Naughty, I’m guilty of it.

Rated a book on goodreads and promised a full review was to come on your blog (and never did)

Nice.

Folded down the page of a book

Nice.

Accidentally spilled on a book

Naughty, as a kid.

DNF a book this year

Naughty.

Bought a book purely because it was pretty with no intention of reading it

Nice, always read the books I borrowed.

Read whilst you were meant to be doing something else (like homework)

Naughty.

Completely missed your Goodreads goal

Nice.

Borrowed a book and not returned it to the library

Nice.

Broke a book buying ban

Nice.

Started a review, left it for ages then forgot what the book was about

Nice.

Wrote in a book you were reading

Nice, I would never do that.

Finished a book and not added it to your Goodreads

Nice, I add all the books I read to goodreads.

Borrowed a book and not returned it to a friend

Nice, I have never borrowed a book and not returned.

Dodged someone asking if they can borrow a book

Nice, always been willing to lend books.

Broke the spine of someone else’s book

Nice, never done it.

Took the jacket off a book to protect it and ended up making it more damaged

Nice.

Sat on a book accidentally

Nice.

14 : Nice

4 : Naughty

Alex

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Christmas Cracker Book Tag

I just want to say Happy Christmas Eve.

QUESTIONS:
1. Pick a book with a wintery cover.

A Family for Christmas
by Mona Ingram

A Family for Christmas
2. Pick a book you’re likely to buy as a present.

The President Is Missing
by Bill Clinton, James Patterson

The President Is Missing
3. Pick a festive themed book.

Kisses in the Snow(Second Chance) by CeeCee James

Kisses in the Snow (Second Chance)
4. Pick a book you can curl up with by the fireplace.

I Was Born for This
by Alice Oseman

I Was Born for This
5. Pick a book you want to read over the festive period.

What Light
by Jay Asher

What Light
6. Pick a book that’s so good it gives you the chills.

Parrotfish
by Ellen Wittlinger

Parrotfish
7. Pick a book going on your Christmas wishlist.

Freakboy
by Kristin Elizabeth Clark

Freakboy

Alex

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The Joy of Christmas Book Tag

Creator  Sam’s Nonsense
The questions:
1) Anticipation: The Christmas excitement is real, what book release(s) are you most anticipating?

I Wish You All the Best
by Mason Deaver

I Wish You All the Best

2) Christmas Songs & Carols: What book or author can you not help but sing it’s praises?

Stacy Claflin

Stacy Claflin

3) Gingerbread Houses: What book or series has wonderful world building?

The Good Daughter (The Good Daughter #1)
by Karin Slaughter

The Good Daughter

4) A Christmas Carol: Favorite classic or one that you want to read

1984
by George Orwell

1984

5) Christmas Sweets: What book would you love to receive for Christmas

Becoming Nicole: The Transformation of an American Family
by Amy Ellis Nutt

Becoming Nicole: The Transformation of an American Family

6) Candles in the Window: What book gives you that warm fuzzy feeling

Symptoms of Being Human
by Jeff Garvin

Symptoms of Being Human

7) Christmas Trees & Decorations: What are some of your favorite book covers?

Who's That Girl This is How It Always Is Our Own Private Universe Sweethearts

8) Christmas Joy: What are some of your favorite things about Christmas And/Or some of your favorite Christmas memories?

Watching Christmas movies with my mum and sister.

Alex

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Nightmare Before Christmas BOOK Tag

I never watched this movie but doing this book tag the same.

Questions

  • Sally –loves someone a lot and gets them in the end

The Definition of Normal: A Tender Transgender Love Story
by E.S. Carpenter

The Definition of Normal: A Tender Transgender Love Story

  • Jack – a character that longs for more

The Kiss Quotient (The Kiss Quotient #1)
by Helen Hoang

The Kiss Quotient (The Kiss Quotient, #1)

  • Zero – side kick character

Luna
by Julie Anne Peters

Luna ( Luna’s sister Regan)

  • Oogie boogie – a book with a wicked villain

The Tattooist of Auschwitz
by Heather Morris

The Tattooist of Auschwitz

  • Halloween town – a book with a creepy theme

Rattle (The Bone Collector #1)
by Fiona Cummins

Rattle (The Bone Collector, #1)

  • Christmas town – a book that left you feeling warm and fuzzy

Before I Had the Words: On Being a Transgender Young Adult
by Skylar Kergil

Before I Had the Words: On Being a Transgender Young Adult

  • What is this – book that took you by surprise

Truly Deadly (Truly Deadly #1)
by Rob Aspinall

Truly Deadly

Alex

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Firsts Lines Fridays

Tick Tock by James Patterson

Lines

Imagine this: You’re in your favorite bookstore, scanning the shelves. You get to the section where a favorite author’s books reside, and there, nestled in comfortably between the incredibly familiar spines, sits a red notebook.
What do you do?
The choice, I think, is obvious:
You take down the red notebook and open it.
And then you do whatever it tells you to do.
It was Christmastime in New York City, the most detestable time of the year. The moo-like crowds, the endless visits from hapless relatives, the ersatz cheer, the joyless attempts at joyfulness—my natural aversion to human contact could only intensify in this context. Wherever I went, I was on the wrong end of the stampede. I was not willing to grant “salvation” through any “army.” I would never care about the whiteness of Christmas. I was a Decemberist, a Bolshevik, a career criminal, a philatelist trapped by unknowable anguish—whatever everyone else was not, I was willing to be. I walked as invisibly as I could through the Pavlovian spend-drunk hordes, the broken winter breakers, the foreigners who had flown halfway across the world to see the lighting of a tree without realizing how completely pagan such a ritual was.

You’re in your favorite bookstore, scanning the shelves. You get to the section where a favorite author’s books reside, and there, nestled in comfortably between the incredibly familiar spines, sits a red notebook.

What do you do?

The choice, I think, is obvious:

You take down the red notebook and open it.

And then you do whatever it tells you to do.

It was Christmastime in New York City, the most detestable time of the year. The moo-like crowds, the endless visits from hapless relatives, the ersatz cheer, the joyless attempts at joyfulness—my natural aversion to human contact could only intensify in this context. Wherever I went, I was on the wrong end of the stampede. I was not willing to grant “salvation” through any “army.” I would never care about the whiteness of Christmas. I was a Decemberist, a Bolshevik, a career criminal, a philatelist trapped by unknowable anguish—whatever everyone else was not, I was willing to be. I walked as invisibly as I could through the Pavlovian spend-drunk hordes, the broken winter breakers, the foreigners who had flown halfway across the world to see the lighting of a tree without realizing how completely pagan such a ritual was.

The only bright side of this dim season was that school was shuttered (presumably so everyone could shop ad nauseam and discover that family, like arsenic, works best in small doses … unless you prefer to die). This year I had managed to become a voluntary orphan for Christmas, telling my mother that I was spending it with my father, and my father that I was spending it with my mother, so that each of them booked nonrefundable vacations with their post-divorce paramours. My parents hadn’t spoken to each other in eight years, which gave me a lot of leeway in the determination of factual accuracy, and therefore a lot of time to myself.

I was popping back and forth between their apartments while they were away—but mostly I was spending time in the Strand, that bastion of titillating erudition, not so much a bookstore as the collision of a hundred different bookstores, with literary wreckage strewn over eighteen miles of shelves. All the clerks there saunter-slouch around distractedly in their skinny jeans and their thrift-store button-downs, like older siblings who will never, ever be bothered to talk to you or care about you or even acknowledge your existence if their friends are around … which they always are. Some bookstores want you to believe they’re a community center, like they need to host a cookie-making class in order to sell you some Proust. But the Strand leaves you completely on your own, caught between the warring forces of organization and idiosyncrasy, with idiosyncrasy winning every time. In other words, it was my kind of graveyard.

I was usually in the mood to look for nothing in particular when I went to the Strand. Some days, I would decide that the afternoon was sponsored by a particular letter, and would visit each and every section to check out the authors whose last names began with that letter. Other days, I would decide to tackle a single section, or would investigate the recently unloaded tomes, thrown in bins that never really conformed to alphabetization. Or maybe I’d only look at books with green covers, because it had been too long since I’d read a book with a green cover.

I could have been hanging out with my friends, but most of them were hanging out with their families or their Wiis. (Wiis? Wiii? What is the plural?) I preferred to hang out with the dead, dying, or desperate books—used we call them, in a way that we’d never call a person, unless we meant it cruelly. (“Look at Clarissa … she’s such a used girl.”)

I was horribly bookish, to the point of coming right out and saying it, which I knew was not socially acceptable.

Hint:

Christmas

The Cover

Dash & Lily's Book of Dares (Dash & Lily, #1) Goodreads

Alex