Top Five Wednesday/Covers You’d Like To Be Transported Into

Hosted by Sam @ Thoughts on Tomes and Lainey @ gingerreadslainey.

August 2nd 2017 : Book Covers You’d Live In
— We all love a good cover but what are some covers you’d like to be transported into?

This Foreign Affair (The Pink Bean, #4)
This Foreign Affair
(The Pink Bean #4)
by Harper Bliss 
Coconutty Christmas: Holiday in Hawaii (Escape #3.5)
Coconutty Christmas: Holiday in Hawaii
(Escape #3.5)
by Ann Omasta
Life's Forever Changed (Show Me, #0.5)
Life’s Forever Changed
(The Show Me 0.5)
by Anne Stone
Miracle at the Museum of Broken Hearts
Miracle at the Museum of Broken Hearts
by Talli Roland
Summer at West Sands Guest House
Summer at West Sands Guest House
by Maggie Conway

Alex

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Top Five Wednesday *Rewind*

Hosted by Sam @ Thoughts on Tomes and Lainey @ gingerreadslainey.

August 29 2018: Book List for Class on [pick genre/trope/etc]
–Just in time for back to school, create a reading list for a class on a bookish topic of your choice

Disability

Finding Me
Finding Me
by Kelly Gunderman

Sixteen-year-old Claire Williams spends most of her days feeling angry and alone. After a car accident took her mother and Claire’s ability to walk, life in a wheelchair is the new normal.
When she’s sent to live with her grandmother, away from school and friends, Claire has a chance for a fresh start. Just when Claire thinks she can handle things, she runs into Todd – the son of the man who caused the car accident.

At first, Claire wants nothing to do with him, but the more time they spend together, the more she hates to admit her feelings. She’s slowly falling in love with Todd.

Now, Claire’s father wants to move and take Claire with him. But she can’t go. Not now when everything is falling into place, and she’s just now finding herself. Claire’s defiant. She won’t leave Greenwood, her new friends, her grandmother, or Todd.

Can Claire find the strength to let her dad go on with his life while leaving her behind to live hers, or will she allow the guilt and shame of surviving the accident pull her back under?

Reaching for Sun
Reaching for Sun
by Tracie Vaughn Zimmer

Josie Wyatt knows what it means to be different. Her family’s small farmhouse seems to shrink each time another mansion grows up behind it. She lives with her career-obsessed mom and opinionated Gran, but has never known her father. Then there’s her cerebral palsy: even if Josie wants to forget that she was born with a disability, her mom can’t seem to let it go. Yet when a strange new boy—Jordan—moves into one of the houses nearby, he seems oblivious to all the things that make Josie different. Before long, Josie finds herself reaching out for something she’s never really known: a friend… and possibly more. Interlinked free verse poems tell the beautiful, heartfelt story of a girl, a family farm reduced to a garden, and a year of unforgettable growth.

You're Welcome, Universe
You’re Welcome, Universe
by Whitney Gardner

When Julia finds a slur about her best friend scrawled across the back of the Kingston School for the Deaf, she covers it up with a beautiful (albeit illegal) graffiti mural.

Her supposed best friend snitches, the principal expels her, and her two mothers set Julia up with a one-way ticket to a “mainstream” school in the suburbs, where she’s treated like an outcast as the only deaf student. The last thing she has left is her art, and not even Banksy himself could convince her to give that up.

Out in the ’burbs, Julia paints anywhere she can, eager to claim some turf of her own. But Julia soon learns that she might not be the only vandal in town. Someone is adding to her tags, making them better, showing off—and showing Julia up in the process. She expected her art might get painted over by cops. But she never imagined getting dragged into a full-blown graffiti war.

Laughing at My Nightmare
Laughing at My Nightmare
by Shane Burcaw

With acerbic wit and a hilarious voice, Shane Burcaw’s Laughing at My Nightmare describes the challenges he faces as a twenty-one-year-old with spinal muscular atrophy. From awkward handshakes to having a girlfriend and everything in between, Shane handles his situation with humor and a “you-only-live-once” perspective on life. While he does talk about everyday issues that are relatable to teens, he also offers an eye-opening perspective on what it is like to have a life threatening disease.

Can't Escape Love (Reluctant Royals, #2.6)
Can’t Escape Love
(Reluctant Royals #2.6)
by Alyssa Cole

Regina Hobbs is nerdy by nature, businesswoman by nurture. She’s finally taking her pop culture-centered media enterprise, Girls with Glasses, to the next level, but the stress is forcing her to face a familiar supervillain: insomnia. The only thing that helps her sleep when things get this bad is the deep, soothing voice of puzzle-obsessed live streamer Gustave Nguyen. The problem? His archive has been deleted.

Gus has been tasked with creating an escape room themed around a romance anime…except he knows nothing about romance or anime. Then mega-nerd and anime expert Reggie comes calling, and they make a trade: his voice for her knowledge. But when their online friendship has IRL chemistry, will they be able to escape love?

Alex

Top Five Wednesday

Today I’m sharing with my top five favourite novels written in verse.

Long Way Down
Long Way Down
by Jason Reynolds

Goodreads Blurb

1 hour, 43 minutes

An ode to Put the Damn Guns Down, this is New York Times bestseller Jason Reynolds’s fiercely stunning novel that takes place in sixty potent seconds—the time it takes a kid to decide whether or not he’s going to murder the guy who killed his brother.

A cannon. A strap.
A piece. A biscuit.
A burner. A heater.
A chopper. A gat.
A hammer
A tool
for RULE

Or, you can call it a gun. That’s what fifteen-year-old Will has shoved in the back waistband of his jeans. See, his brother Shawn was just murdered. And Will knows the rules. No crying. No snitching. Revenge. That’s where Will’s now heading, with that gun shoved in the back waistband of his jeans, the gun that was his brother’s gun. He gets on the elevator, seventh floor, stoked. He knows who he’s after. Or does he? As the elevator stops on the sixth floor, on comes Buck. Buck, Will finds out, is who gave Shawn the gun before Will took the gun. Buck tells Will to check that the gun is even loaded. And that’s when Will sees that one bullet is missing. And the only one who could have fired Shawn’s gun was Shawn. Huh. Will didn’t know that Shawn had ever actually USED his gun. Bigger huh. BUCK IS DEAD. But Buck’s in the elevator? Just as Will’s trying to think this through, the door to the next floor opens. A teenage girl gets on, waves away the smoke from Dead Buck’s cigarette. Will doesn’t know her, but she knew him. Knew. When they were eight. And stray bullets had cut through the playground, and Will had tried to cover her, but she was hit anyway, and so what she wants to know, on that fifth floor elevator stop, is, what if Will, Will with the gun shoved in the back waistband of his jeans, MISSES.

And so it goes, the whole long way down, as the elevator stops on each floor, and at each stop someone connected to his brother gets on to give Will a piece to a bigger story than the one he thinks he knows. A story that might never know an END…if WILL gets off that elevator.

Told in short, fierce staccato narrative verse, Long Way Down is a fast and furious, dazzlingly brilliant look at teenage gun violence, as could only be told by Jason Reynolds.

The Poet X
The Poet X
by Elizabeth Acevedo

Goodreads Blurb

A young girl in Harlem discovers slam poetry as a way to understand her mother’s religion and her own relationship to the world. Debut novel of renowned slam poet Elizabeth Acevedo.

Xiomara Batista feels unheard and unable to hide in her Harlem neighborhood. Ever since her body grew into curves, she has learned to let her fists and her fierceness do the talking.

But Xiomara has plenty she wants to say, and she pours all her frustration and passion onto the pages of a leather notebook, reciting the words to herself like prayers—especially after she catches feelings for a boy in her bio class named Aman, who her family can never know about. With Mami’s determination to force her daughter to obey the laws of the church, Xiomara understands that her thoughts are best kept to herself.

So when she is invited to join her school’s slam poetry club, she doesn’t know how she could ever attend without her mami finding out, much less speak her words out loud. But still, she can’t stop thinking about performing her poems.

Because in the face of a world that may not want to hear her, Xiomara refuses to be silent.

Brown Girl Dreaming
Brown Girl Dreaming
by Jacqueline Woodson

Goodreads Blurb

acqueline Woodson, one of today’s finest writers, tells the moving story of her childhood in mesmerizing verse.

Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child’s soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson’s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become.

Reaching for Sun
Reaching for Sun
by Tracie Vaughn Zimmer

Goodreads Blurb

Josie Wyatt knows what it means to be different. Her family’s small farmhouse seems to shrink each time another mansion grows up behind it. She lives with her career-obsessed mom and opinionated Gran, but has never known her father. Then there’s her cerebral palsy: even if Josie wants to forget that she was born with a disability, her mom can’t seem to let it go. Yet when a strange new boy—Jordan—moves into one of the houses nearby, he seems oblivious to all the things that make Josie different. Before long, Josie finds herself reaching out for something she’s never really known: a friend… and possibly more. Interlinked free verse poems tell the beautiful, heartfelt story of a girl, a family farm reduced to a garden, and a year of unforgettable growth.

Orchards
Orchards
by Holly Thompson

Goodreads Blurb

After a classmate commits suicide, Kana Goldberg—a half-Japanese, half-Jewish American—wonders who is responsible. She and her cliquey friends said some thoughtless things to the girl. Hoping that Kana will reflect on her behavior, her parents pack her off to her mother’s ancestral home in Japan for the summer. There Kana spends hours under the hot sun tending to her family’s mikan orange groves.

Kana’s mixed heritage makes it hard to fit in at first, especially under the critical eye of her traditional grandmother, who has never accepted Kana’s father. But as the summer unfolds, Kana gets to know her relatives, Japan, and village culture, and she begins to process the pain and guilt she feels about the tragedy back home. Then news about a friend sends her world spinning out of orbit all over again.

Alex

Top Five Wednesday *Rewind*

Hosted by Sam @ Thoughts on Tomes and Lainey @ gingerreadslainey.

July 13th: Books You Wish Had Sequels 
— Standalones that you wish had a sequel or the last book in the series that you wish wasn’t the last.

The Good Immigrant: 26 Writers Reflect on America
The Good Immigrant: 26 Writers Reflect on America
by Nikesh Shukla
Love at Cooper's Creek
Love at Cooper’s Creek
by Missouri Vaun
A Boy Called Cin
A Boy Called Cin
by Cecil Wilde
Dropping In
Dropping In
by Geoff Havel
It's Not a Date
It’s Not a Date
by Heather Blackmore

I have a ton more book on my list but I can only choose five.

Alex

 

Top Five Wednesday

Hosted by Sam @ Thoughts on Tomes and Lainey @ gingerreadslainey.

July 11th 2018: Future Classics
–What books do you think with stand the test of time?

A Very Large Expanse of Sea
A Very Large Expanse of Sea
by Tahereh Mafi
Ivy Aberdeen's Letter to the World
Ivy Aberdeen’s Letter to the World
by Ashley Herring Blake
Like a Love Story
Like a Love Story
by Abdi Nazemian
With the Fire on High
With the Fire on High
by Elizabeth Acevedo 
The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity and Hope
The Boy Who Harnessed the Wind: Creating Currents of Electricity and Hope
by William Kamkwamba, Bryan Mealer

Alex

Top Five Wednesday *Rewind*

Hosted by Sam @ Thoughts on Tomes and Lainey @ gingerreadslainey.

March 4th 2015 – Books You’d Save in a Fire

Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out
Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out
by Susan Kuklin

I would save this book to remind me that I’m not alone.

A Seat at the Table
A Seat at the Table
by Simon Bartolo

For me, this book is the history of the lgbtqia+ community in Malta.

LGBTIQ Youth Activism: The past & the present
LGBTIQ Youth Activism: The past & the present
by Bizuayehu Castaniere, Kirsty Farrugia

I have two reasons of my why, some of my friends took part in this book and it gives me hope for a better tomorrow.

The Secret Life of Bees
The Secret Life of Bees
by Sue Monk Kidd

This book started my love for historical fiction.

The Definition of Normal: ...A Transgender Love Story
The Definition of Normal: …A Transgender Love Story
by E.S. Carpenter

This is the first book that I read with a trans main character and I remember being so happy about this that I cried.

Alex